WEEKLY ART NEWS | THE WEEK IN PICTURES

7th November 2014
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Agata Adamczewska
mast2 WEEKLY ART NEWS | THE WEEK IN PICTURESA detail from: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled, 1986. Photo: Collection of Larry Warsh. Copyright © Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. By Gavin Ashworth, Brooklyn Museum

Jean-Michel Basquiat’s 80s notebooks revealed

Like many an artist, Jean-Michel Basquiat used his notebooks and journals as a workshop of ideas in which to test out many of the thoughts that would eventually make their way into his paintings. Indeed, in those early notebooks, dating from 1980 and 1981, he would draw images of skulls, crowns and tepees, which can be found in later works. Now, eight of those notebooks, comprising 160 images never seen before in public, are due to go on view at the Brooklyn Museum next April. Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks” (3 April-23 August 2015) includes 160 unbound pages from journals the artist filled with sketches and notes between 1980 and 1987. They’re owned by the renowned art collector Larry Walsh, and will be supplemented by another 30 or so drawings and paintings from other collections.

Phaidon

London Exhibition Showcases Artist-Neuroscientists Collaboration

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The Flashing Brain Installation | Paz Martinez Capuz and Henry Flitton ©Art Neuro

In a three-day exhibition celebrating the intricacies of the brain, 16 neuroscientists and artists have come together to showcase the products of an art-science collaboration. Art Neuro opens today at the Rag Factory just off Brick Lane in East London, and displays 16 original artworks. Seeking to address some of the quirkier sides of scientific exploration and discovery, some of the questions that the artist-scientist collective ask are “do bees get bored? Can LSD be used to treat mental illness?” and “Can fish become drug addicts?”

Wired

Bryan Adams’ heartstopping images of wounded British soldiers to go on show at Somerset House

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Wounded: The Legacy of War | Rifleman Craig Wood, injured in Afghanistan, aged 18 © Bryan Adams

‘Silence, a sense of reflection,” is the response that Bryan Adams hopes his portraits of wounded British Armed Forces personnel will inspire in those visiting his exhibition at Somerset House over the coming months. But, as tends to be the case with simple ideas expertly executed, one is equally left thinking ‘Why has this not been done before?’. In Wounded: The Legacy of War, he presents servicemen and women from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and the injuries they have sustained, matter-of-factly. Their missing limbs, prosthetics and scar tissue are seen by the viewer as part of the subjects as they are now.

The Independent

Tate Modern unveils new acquisitions from Korean ‘father of video art’ bought after £6m Hyundai deal

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Tate Modern has acquired nine key works by Nam June Paik, the Seoul-born inventor of video art, who died aged 73 in 2006

A series of pioneering works by the Korean “father of video art”, whose installations anticipated the YouTube age, will go on display at Tate Modern today, after being acquired by the institution. A record £6 million, multi-year sponsorship deal with Korean carmaker Hyundai, has helped Tate Modern acquire nine key works by Nam June Paik, the Seoul-born inventor of video art, who died aged 73 in 2006.

The Independent

Edouard Manet’s painting “Le Printemps’ sells for $65 million at Christie’s auction

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A Christie's employee speaks about Fernand Leger's "Les constructeurs avec arbre" during a media preview October 31, 2014 at Christie's in New York. AFP PHOTO/Don Emmert. © Art Daily

A stunning 1881 masterpiece by Edouard Manet sold for $65 million at auction in New York on Wednesday, a record for a work by the French impressionist artist. “Le Printemps,” which the auction house Christie’s had valued at $25-30 million, depicts a famous actress of the day and was exhibited in 1882 to critical acclaim while Manet was one of the most famous living artists. The canvas has been owned by the same family for more than a century and for the last 20 years been on loan to the National Gallery of Art in Washington. It was snapped up by a buyer in the front row who calmly fended off furious bidding on the telephone to clinch the picture for $65.13 million. The previous auction record for a work of art by Manet was $33 million — a self-portrait sold in 2010 at Sotheby’s in London. Later in the evening, Christie’s sold “Les constructeurs avec arbre” by French cubist painter Fernand Leger for $17.53 million after much slower bidding.  The auction house had valued the painting at up to $22 million.

Art Daily

One of world’s best private collections gets public airing in Madrid gallery

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Art collector Ana Gamazo poses in front of Francis Bacon's Triptych at the Abello Collection exhibition in Madrid, Spain. Photograph: Paul White/AP

Fear was the emotion that came to mind when Ana Gamazo was first approached about putting her private art collection on display. Gamazo and her husband, prominent Spanish businessman Juan Abelló, had spent nearly three decades amassing some 500 pieces in a collection considered by Spanish curators to rank among the best in the world. But the collection had been guided by the pair’s personal taste, leaving Gamazo terrified of how revealing the exhibition would be. “What would critics say? What would people think of the art we own?”. The couple were eventually convinced and the Abelló Collection, currently on display at Madrid’s CentroCentro Cibeles, features 160 works spanning five centuries.

The Guardian

Photo London ‘to utterly transform the photography audience’

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The Photographers' Gallery in London. Photo London will bring together 60 galleries. Photograph: View Pictures/REX

Plans to create the photographic equivalent of the Frieze contemporary art fair were announced on Thursday, with a new annual event hoping to tap into an explosion of interest. Photo London will bring together 60 galleries for five days at London’s Somerset House with the aim of creating “the best photography fair in the world – bar none,” according to Michael Benson, one of the driving forces behind it. As well as commercial galleries there will be a programme of public events, talks and installations including a display of hidden treasures from the V&A’s vast photographic archives.

The Guardian